By the Numbers

580Mothers in 580 hospitals around the United State got a free Disney Cuddly Bodysuit, a variation of the Onesie, along with other traditional baby products. It’s part of the Walt Disney Company starting a new product line and marketing campaign aimed at newborns.

$3 Million. A group of doctors that own a majority stake in Doctors’ Hospital of Michigan have pooled $3 million and today plan to buy out the 35 percent share of a regional health care system. From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110208/BIZ/102080328/Physician-owners-ante-up-$3M-to-save-Doctors’-Hospital-in-Pontiac#ixzz1DNKtxXYH

$424 million — The trade group representing Tennessee’s hospitals has voted unanimously to ask the legislature to approve a hospital fee that would avoid millions in TennCare cuts — at least temporarily. The fee, which would not be passed on to patients, would save the hospitals money because the estimated $424 million they would put into the TennCare program would be matched 2-to-1 by the federal government, Tennessee Hospital Association President and CEO Craig Becker said

8 – States as examples. Hospitals in Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas, among others, stopped hiring smokers in the last year and more are openly considering the option. More hospitals and medical businesses in many states are adopting strict policies that make smoking a reason to turn away job applicants, saying they want to increase worker productivity, reduce health care costs and encourage healthier living.

11 — Park University called in 11 speakers to discuss reform’s effect on state, local and nonprofit entities for a symposium called symposium, “The Impact of Healthcare Reform on Greater Kansas City.” Speakers ranged from Linda Sheppard, director of the accident and health division of the Kansas Insurance Department, to Gerard Grimaldi, vice president of health policy and government relations for Truman Medical Centers.

2,500 – A “best guess” of the number of 50-year-old women you would have to screen for 10 years in order to help one avoid a breast cancer death, according to Dartmouth researchers and physicians H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin.

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