By the Numbers: Headlines in healthcare

10 – As in 10 percent. A U.S. program to help make sure hospital staff maintain strict hygiene standards lowered death rates in intensive care units by 10 percent, U.S. researchers reported. Their study, published in the British Medical Journal, adds to a growing body of evidence that changing the hospital culture, including using checklists modeled on those employed by pilots, can reduce errors, saving lives and costs.

2.5 million – Patients admitted to California hospitals during the years 1999 through 2008 whose records were included in a study that suggested Hospitals that spend more money treating patients with acute illnesses may be better at keeping those patients alive. The finding is in line with recent research, but it challenges an assumption held by many policymakers that hospitals can be forced to spend less without significant consequences for patient health. 

31 – Physicians in One Medical Group, a new model for primary care that aims to set a nationwide example. With physicians in San Francisco and New York, it offers most of the same services provided by personalized “concierge” medical practices, but at a much lower price: $150 to $200 a year, according to the New York Times.

6 – Proven strategies for physician recruitment, according to Becker’s ASC Review.

$150 million – Boost from local high-tech companies for Stanford’s new hospital. The companies — Apple, eBay, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Intuit and Oracle — say they are supporting Stanford’s six-year project because high-quality health care, along with education and housing, helps them recruit and keep top employees healthy, happy and challenged, according to the San Jose Mercury News.

4 — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois and the Illinois Hospital Association have launched a four-year joint initiative to reduce some of the nation’s highest hospital readmission rates,

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